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Current And Past Social Security Earnings Limits

Earnings Limits Only Apply Prior To Full Retirement Age

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If you take Social Security benefits before you reach full retirement age, and you earn income in excess of the annual earnings limit, your Social Security benefits will be reduced. Below are the current and past years' earnings limits for reference.

For details on what type of income counts as earnings, how this limit applies, and how much of a reduction you could experience, read Earning More Than The Social Security Earnings Limit Can Reduce Your Benefits.

1. 2014 Earnings Limit

For 2014, the annual Social Security earnings limit once again went up slightly. This is normal as it is indexed to inflation. It is now $15,480 ($1,290 per month). This earnings limit applies to the years before you reach full retirement age.

It means if you are receiving Social Security benefits and you are not yet full retirement age, you can earn up to $15,480 and your benefits will not be reduced. If you earn over that amount, you may owe some of your Social Security benefits back.

The earnings limit for the year you turn full retirement age went up to $41,400.

On the Social Security page titled Exempt Amounts Under the Earnings Test they refer to something they call "normal retirement age" or "NRA". This is the same as full retirement age. Why they don't use consistent terminology, I don't know.

2. 2013 Earnings Limit

In 2013, the annual Social Security earnings limit went up slightly. It is now $15,120 ($1,260 per month). This applies to the years before you reach full retirement age.

That means if you are receiving Social Security benefits and you are not yet full retirement age, you can earn up to $15,120 and your benefits will not be reduced. 

Earnings limit the year you turn full retirement age is $40,080.

3. 2012 Earnings Limit

In 2012, the annual Social Security earnings limit went up slightly. It is now $14,640 ($1,220 per month). This applies to the years before you reach full retirement age.

That means if you are receiving Social Security benefits and you are not yet full retirement age, you can earn up to $14,160 and your benefits will not be reduced. 

Earnings limit the year you turn full retirement age is $38,880.

4. 2011 Earnings Limit

In 2011, once again the annual earnings limit remains at $14,160 ($1,180 per month).

That means if you are receiving Social Security benefits and you are not yet full retirement age, you can earn up to $14,160 and your benefits will not be reduced.

Earnings limit the year you turn full retirement age is $37,680.

5. 2010 Earnings Limit

In 2010, the annual earnings limit remains at $14,160.

That means if you are receiving Social Security benefits and you are not yet full retirement age, you can earn up to $14,160 and your benefits will not be reduced. 

6. 2009 Earnings Limit

In 2009, the annual earnings limit was $14,160.

That means if you were receiving Social Security benefits and you had not yet reached full retirement age, you could have earned up to $14,160 and your benefits would not have been reduced.

7. 2008 Earnings Limit

In 2008, the annual earnings limit was $13,560.

That means if you were receiving Social Security benefits and you had not yet reached full retirement age, you could have earned up to $13,560 and your benefits would not have been reduced.

8. 2007 Earnings Limit

In 2007, the annual earnings limit was $12,960.

That means if you were receiving Social Security benefits and you had not yet reached full retirement age, you could have earned up to $12,960 and your benefits would not have been reduced.

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